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Best Business Books 2017: Strategy

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This year’s best business books on strategy focus to different degrees on the importance and practice of innovation, Ken Favaro writes. The most compelling of this year’s crop is If You’re in a Dogfight, Become a Cat, in which Leonard Sherman describes how market-leading companies can continue to build profitable growth over the long term. In The Net and the Butterfly, Olivia Fox Cabane and Judah Pollack investigate the neuroscience behind innovation and lay out a detailed road map for how executives can link its power to strategy. And in Smart Collaboration, Heidi K. Gardner details the ways in which effective and efficient collaboration can lead to outperformance.
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Best Business Books 2017: Leadership

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Sally Helgesen writes that this year’s best business books on leadership hammer home the importance of such human values as flexibility, humility, and courage. Sam Walker’s The Captain Class describes the ways athletic success rests on team captains, whose leadership capabilities are as impressive as their athletic capabilities. One Mission, by Chris Fussell with C.W. Goodyear, offers valuable insight on how lessons learned about cross-disciplinary collaboration on the battlefield can be applied in the boardroom. And Susan David’s Emotional Agility adds an important dimension to our understanding of how we can align our behaviors with our values and intentions.
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Best Business Books 2017: Narratives

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Bethany McLean reviews the best business books of the year that take the form of narratives, and they focus on issues of crime and punishment — or lack of punishment. In Why They Do It, Harvard Business School professor Eugene Soltes gets up close and personal with dozens of white-collar criminals to learn how they went astray. Cyrus Bozorgmehr, in Once Upon a Time in Shaolin, tells the bizarre, rollicking story of how Wu-Tang Clan set out to record an album that would be sold to — and heard by — a single purchaser, only to wind up doing business with someone even more notorious. Jonathan Taplin, in Move Fast and Break Things, casts a critical eye on the large Internet companies that control so much of our attention — and an increasing amount of our commerce and creative output.
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